Tools to Create Your Own Brand of Bedtime Story
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Why Storytelling?

Why Storytelling?

In a study by Marriage and Family Therapist Kelly Gagalis-Hoffman found that storytelling within the family:
  • creates a family identity
  • promotes the transfer of values from parents to children
  • enables parents and children to see situations from other perspectives
  • influences children to develop positive attitudes toward their parents
  • creates a treasured time for fun and connection
  • facilitates feelings of safety, security, comfort, and belonging
  • gives parents a sense of creative fulfillment
  • gives parents a place to share important things with children in a non-threatening and memorable way

 


What Storytelling Does For Imagination:

  •  1) If you want your child to be a life-long reader they must have an imagination. The more advanced the reading level is within a book, the less you will find illustrations in that book. So, unless your child has practiced the art of forming pictures in their mind, much of the great literature in the world will not be available to them – simply because they won’t have the motivation to keep reading.
  • 2) If you would like your children to follow the Golden Rule – “Do unto others as you would have done unto you,” they will have to be able to imagine how their actions will affect someone else. Moral behavior comes from the ability to imagine how it would feel to be someone else; what it would be like to walk in another person’s shoes. They can imagine what it would be like to experience a certain situation without actually having to experience it themselves.
  • 3) Imagination also gives children the opportunity to solve problems – imagining what the outcome may be if they choose one particular solution, or an alternate one. They can learn to “see” ahead to where a particular choice may ultimately lead.
  • 4) You can give children vicarious learning experiences through their imagination. In some situations, a child can learn just as well from fully imagining something, as they can by actually doing it.